Hello There!

Monday, 26 June 2017


Welcome to a wellness blog aimed at those passionate about wellness in their 40's and beyond. This doesn't mean to say that you can't enjoy the vegan recipes, beauty posts, organic gardening posts and wellness posts if you are under 40.

Exciting posts are added weekly!

I also have a 'sister yoga blog, 'Flexiladies Yoga'. There are yoga posts and videos so please check that out too for the complete wellness package - CLICK HERE



Meatless Monday : A taste of summer, pea and mint soup


If you have been growing peas, you may be harvesting them around now.  We were given some by a fellow allotment grower and they are almost ready.  Have you tried eating peas straight from the pod?  Delicious.  


peas growing

The first and second early potatoes are now ready and we have had a bumper crop.  There is something really satisfying about digging up potatoes.  It is also fascinating that one seed potato can produce many potatoes.  No supermarket potato can match one you have grown yourself.  Growing potatoes is also good for breaking up the soil. 


 Potato plants growing

Picking potatoes

 potatoes

This week's meatless Monday includes both potatoes and peas.  I am also using mint which goes so well with peas.  If you are growing your own, it is best to harvest the leaves before flowering.  

Pea and mint soup

Serves 2

You will need

1 tbsp oil
1 onion, peeled and chopped
225g peas (weight after podding or use frozen)
300g potatoes (or 1 medium potato), diced
Stock made with 1 tsp pink salt dissolved in 500ml hot water
2 tbsp mint leaves chopped + leaves for garnish
1 tbsp coconut cream + extra for garnish
Crusty bread to serve

Heat the oil and cook the onion for 3 minutes.  Add the peas, potatoes and stock and bring to the boil.  Reduce heat to simmer and cook for 15-20 minutes, adding the chopped mint for the last 5 minutes.  Stir in the coconut cream and blend.  Divide between two bowls, swirl some coconut cream on top and garnish with mint leaves. Serve with crusty bread.  

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This week on Flexiladiesyoga

Sunday, 25 June 2017


This week's quality cultivated by yoga is self - awareness. In the video we quieten the mental chatter in order to become aware of our true selves.

For a practice focused on deep standing twists such as Revolved Triangle, Revolved Side Angle or Revolved Half Moon Balance, your warm up should mobilise the spine in all directions and create some length in the spine. 
On my 'sister' blog post is a sample warm up for deep standing twists-http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/building-home-practice-warm-ups-so.html

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Natural help for back pain



good posture helps prevent back pain

Many of us suffer from back pain at some point in our lives, but for some people back pain can become chronic. Below I offer some suggestions which may help:-


If you do suffer from back pain discuss these ways of helping with your medical practitioner.  

Acupuncture - acupuncture is a complementary therapy that you may be able to get on the NHS.  Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) believes that pain is a blockage to the flow of qi, the life energy, or that qi is congested. Qi flows along channels called meridians along which the acupuncture points are located. Needles are inserted just under the skin to encourage the flow of qi (don't be surprised if needles are inserted somewhere other than your back!) It has been found to be very effective for chronic back pain.  

Correct posture faults- we sit at our desks, in our cars and on our sofas and most of our everyday tasks are forward reaching.  The result can be rounding in the upper and lower back caused by tight hamstrings, hip flexors, chest and shoulder muscles and weak core muscles.  Yoga can help.  Nowadays rest is not recommended for back pain except when the pain is severe.  The advice is 'keep moving'.  For help on improving posture please see the following yoga videos on my You Tube Channel:-

'How yoga improves health - posture 1'

'How yoga improves health - posture 2'

Serrapeptase - I have mentioned serrapeptase before but it is my number one recommendation for any inflammation in your body.  For more information on this please see 'Beating inflammation with serrapeptase'.

Beat stress - according to the 'Gate theory of pain', pain can be influenced by psychological factors. The pain messages pass through 'gates' in the spinal cord.  When these gates are open, the pain is felt intensely.  What opens these 'gates'?  Anxiety, fear, depression, stress, fatigue or absence of distractions. What closes these 'gates'? Yoga, meditation, breathing techniques, acupuncture, hypnosis, and TNS.  In other words our 'suffering' is influenced by our thoughts and emotions. Yoga can also help reduce stress, depression and anxiety. 
Please see the following yoga videos on my You Tube Channel:-

'Yoga for stress series'

'Yoga for mild depression'

'Yoga for anxiety'

Meditation releases endorphins from the brain stem which are the body's natural painkillers.  For help on relieving stress, anxiety and depression through yoga please see 'Meditation, Ancient help for 21st century stress'.

Sleep well - if you have chronic back pain try placing a pillow under your knees if you sleep on your back or between your knees if you sleep on your side.  Poor sleep is stressful for your body (see above).

You might also like:-

'Mindful of your posture'

'Yoga for seniors - Posture 1'

'Yoga for seniors - Posture 2'

'Yoga to rebalance - a good night's sleep'

'Love your sleep'

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The vegan diet and protein

Friday, 23 June 2017


People worry a great deal about getting enough protein - in fact you probably need much less that you think you do, around 0.8g for every kilogram of your body weight each day.  On the other hand, it is important to get enough protein as lack of protein can lead to poor immunity and loss of muscle mass.  In extreme cases it can even weaken the heart (the heart is a muscle after all).

Protein is made up of amino acids and there are 20 of these.  Some are known as 'essential' amino acids because your body cannot make them and they must be taken in through your diet.  Animal sources of protein have all the amino acids but most vegetable sources do not. The exceptions are soy beans and products such as tofu, quinoa and buckwheat. BUT if you combine beans or lentils with grains then you have a complete protein. So for example falafel in a pitta bread would provide complete protein as would beans on toast, or lentil curry with rice.  Other sources of protein include nuts and seeds.

Below are some vegan recipes that will provide you with complete protein:-

Mexican tostadas

Spiced chilli beans topped with cornbread

Falafel burgers with mango salsa (served with pittas)

Open tortillas with refried beans

Curried rice and beans with mushrooms 

Swedish meatballs

Argentinian style empanadas 

plus many more recipes on the blog!

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Meditation for the summer solstice

Wednesday, 21 June 2017


The 21st of June is the summer solstice, meaning a time when the 'sun stands still'.  The lighter evenings provide a wonderful opportunity to connect with nature. 

Usually in our garden there is a clearly defined 'day shift' (the birds) and 'night shift' (hedgehogs and bats). With the lighter nights however we had the comical situation where a hedgehog was eating sunflower seeds dropped by the birds at the base of the feeder and a pigeon staring at it with its head on one side as if to say 'what is that?'.  The hedgehog is tiny - I can only think that the hedgehog we fed last year and gave shelter to over the winter has had a baby.  This is wonderful news - hedgehogs are in decline and it would be awful to lose our 'Mrs Tiggywinkles'.  In the garden also the bird 'dads' seem to have taken over the 'childcare' presumably because the females are having another brood. They do such a good job - you see the blackbirds teaching their young to catch worms and sparrow 'dads' being driven crazy by several babies all doing the 'feed me dance' where they stretch their wingss out and shake.  Wildlife makes you laugh, but it also makes you cry. Recently we discovered a baby blackbird on the path late at night - she barely looked old enough to be out of the nest.  We made her a makeshift 'nest' out of a cardboard box, some fluff that we put out for the birds in spring and left her a crumbled fat ball to eat and some water.  We called her Midnight. Next morning when I went to check on her she opened her mouth wide for food. The local vet advised to move her to where there were other birds but she ran off.  Several times over the next couple of days I saw her under the hedge and left food and water for her but after three days we found her dead under her favourite section of the hedge. Obviously something had happened to the parent birds - I suspect the local cat had something to do with it.  

Now more than ever we need to connect with nature.  We are custodians of our earth but we are changing the face of the planet in a detrimental way.  The time to act is now - we need to recognise that all beings are connected and act in a way that benefits all.  Global warming is the big problem this planet faces.  The earth is self-regulating if left to its own devices but we are pouring more carbon-dioxide into the atmosphere than the trees and plants of the earth can use.  The result is the sun's rays are being 'trapped' in the atmosphere and the planet heats up causing droughts and floods, melting polar ice caps and consequent rise in sea levels.  We can all do a little to help.  Please see 'Earth Day 2o15, Wednesday 22nd April'. This is a good reason also to turn to renewables rather than inviting fracking in.  

Try the following meditation  - connecting to the earth will give you a greater sense of wellbeing.

Connect to the earth by standing in bare feet on grass in your garden or in a park.  Notice all the greenery around you and reflect on the connection between animals and plant life. When you exhale carbondioxide, the plants take it up and when plants give out oxygen you breathe it in.  Notice the birds and the birdsong and reflect then on how all animals are connected by the breath. The more we connect with the earth, the more we will love her. The more we love her, the more we will want to protect her.  Stay here as long as you wish feeling the grass between your toes.  


You may also like 'Light meditation for the Summer Solstice' on my YouTube Channel.

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Meatless Monday : Sweet red pepper falafel

Monday, 19 June 2017


Here in Yorkshire we are having a heatwave  - temperatures are higher here than Athens today.  We are so not used to this.  Hot food has temporarily lost its appeal but the beauty of falafel is that it can be enjoyed hot or cold.  It also does not take long to prep so more time to enjoy this glorious weather. Red peppers are coming into season right now so you can roast some if you like.  In the following recipe however I have used whole sweet red peppers from a jar.  

Sweet red pepper falafel 

Serves 2

You will need

For the falafel
1 x 400g can chickpeas, drained 
1/2 red onion, chopped
70g oats
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 1/2 sweet red pepper from a jar
good pinch salt 
1 tsp cumin

Other ingredients
olive oil spray

To serve - pitta bread and a side salad

Place all the ingredients for except the  olive oil spray in a blender and whiz to form a soft paste.  Spray a baking tray with olive oil spray and place tablespoons of the mixture on the tray.  Bake at 180 degrees for around 20 minutes turning once.  Serves hot or cold in pittas with a side salad. 

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This week on Flexiladiesyoga

Sunday, 18 June 2017


In this week's yoga video we cultivate another of the Brahmaviharas or 'divine abodes' - loving kindness.

On my 'sister' blog we look at the origins and benefits of sun salutations -

Building a home practice - yoga warm ups, so worth it! 
On my 'sister' blog we practice a warm up to get ready for a back bending practice-http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/building-home-practice-yoga-warm-ups-so.html

If you are enjoying my videos and blog posts please would you consider a small donation?  Please note however this is not a condition of enjoying my blogs. Please see-http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/p/support-this-blog_44.html

Organic garden update-Harvesting the strawberries


This year we have a bumper crop of strawberries and I do love strawberries! We started with just a few plants donated by a fellow allotment owner in autumn '15 and those few plants have made a good sized strawberry patch.  Strawberries plants can be planted in autumn and spring and because strawberries put out runners a few plants will soon fill a patch. They put out runners which then grow into new plants so that means that people on an allotment usually have some to spare.

strawberries growing on the allotment 

If you want to start a strawberry patch in a garden or an allotment choose a sunny but sheltered spot and fertilse with well rotted manure.  You can also grow strawberries in a pot. They will spread so plant them 18 inches apart and allow 30 inches between rows. There are two types of strawberries - summer fruiting and perpetual which produce fruit from early summer to early autumn.  When the fruits start to appear, place straw under the strawberries to stop the soil rotting the fruits.  Once the fruits start to redden, you need to cover them with netting or the birds will take your harvest.  

We have found strawberries easy to grow - we have a crop of luscious fruits without the need for pesticides. Supermarkets don't tend to keep organic strawberries because they need to be eaten quite quickly after picking - which is not a problem with us!  It is well worth growing some to enjoy a taste of summer while at the same time knowing you are not adding toxins to your body. Enjoy them just as they are in fruit salads, on your morning oats, or in smoothies or maybe try my Strawberry shortcake sundaes. For the recipe please see 'It's strawberry season!'


strawberry shortcake sundaes

Have a great summer! 

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Father's Day gift to make : Aftershave

Thursday, 15 June 2017


                                                                                                  My dad and I 

Many people buy aftershave for their dads/husbands for Father's day but these can contain harmful chemicals. The worry is that more than half these chemicals can be absorbed into the blood within minutes of application and in fact absorption through the face is higher than the rest of your body.  Shaving also increases circulation to the face which again aids absorption.  An example of a chemical used is propolene glycol, which is the same stuff as in antifreeze!  Other ingredients in aftershave include ones that disrupt hormones and some that are carcinogens.

This year then, why not make dad an aftershave using essential oils. Essential oils have been used for thousands of years.  They are generally safe, easily excreted by the body and do not leave toxins in the body.  

Below is a recipe for aftershave using essential oils - it has a spicy, earthy sweet scent. Clove and bergamot essential oils are antiseptic, sandalwood is astringent and lemon is refreshing and rejuvenates the skin.  Use a glass roller bottle or a glass spray bottle not plastic to prevent chemicals from the plastic leaching into the blend.

Essential oils aftershave
You will need

20ml witch hazel
60ml rosewater
10ml apple cider vinegar
10ml tincture of benzoin
4 drops clove essential oil
6 drops sandalwood essential oil
12 drops bergamot essential oil
5 drops lemon essential oil

Safety note - do not use essential oils without professional advice if you have any medical condition.

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Meatless Monday : Asian quinoa salad

Monday, 12 June 2017


Salads need not be boring as this Asian inspired quinoa salad shows.  Healthy, quick to prepare and delicious, it would make a good packed lunch.

You will need

Serves 2

150g quinoa
250g shell on frozen edamame beans 
1 medium carrot, julienned
1/2 red pepper, diced
1/3 cucumber, diced
1 tomato, chopped
piece red cabbage, shredded (optional)

Dressing 
2 tbsp tamari
1 tbsp sesame oil
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar
Pinch cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp stevia

Toppings 
sliced spring onions 
sprinkle sesame seeds

Place the quinoa in a saucepan, cover with water and bring to the boil.  Reduce heat to simmer and cook for around 15 minutes until the water is absorbed.  Leave to cool then fluff with a fork.  Meanwhile boil some water in another saucepan, drop the edamame beans in and cook for 4-5 minutes.  Tip into a colander over the sink and cool with cold water.  Shell.
Add the vegetables to the quinoa.  In a bowl mix the ingredients for the dressing and stir through the quinoa and vegetable mixture.  Divide between bowls and top with sliced spring onions as sesame seeds.


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Enjoy!



This week on Flexiladiesyoga

Sunday, 11 June 2017


This week's quality cultivated by yoga is empowerment.
Blog post and yoga video on my 'sister' blog- http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/qualities-cultivated-by-yoga-empowerment.html

You may have heard yogis speak of prana, the life force energy, that pervades all living things and the universe. This energy moves in the body in 5 ways known as the vayus which translates as 'winds'.
On my 'sister' blog post there is a guide to the vayus for beginners and yoga videos to help cultivate them- http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/beginners-guide-to-vayus.html

There is much talk about how yoga can lead to injury but very little about how yoga can PREVENT injury.
On my 'sister' blog we look at some of the ways yoga actually prevents injury- 
http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/how-yoga-helps-prevent-injury.html


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Natural help for osteoarthritis


Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease that is the result of cartilage, which cushions the ends of bones in the joints, wearing away so that bone meets bone (ouch!) leading to the erosion of the ends of the bones.  A great deal can be done however to reduce the pain associated with this condition in particular diet, exercise and supplements. 

A diet to reduce the pain of arthritis should be an alkaline diet - if you are vegan you already avoid meat and dairy which alter the body's pH (a measure of acidity) towards acidity but also avoid sugar and reduce salt which have a similar effect on the acidity of the body. Unfortunately too, most grains are acidic - try to avoid highly acidic grains such as rye and wheat and opt for quinoa instead. Oats, millet, amaranth and buckwheat are only mildly acidic. All fruits and veg and most nuts (except peanuts and walnuts) and seeds are alkalising (yes even, counter-intuitively citrus fruits). Include beans, lentils and tofu in an alkalising diet. The problem is that if the body is too acidic the body will try to restore balance by drawing minerals from your tissues including bones. An alkaline diet can also help reduce the inflammation associated with the condition.

Exercise is important to help reduce pain also. It increases the range of motion in the joints which may stiffen as a result of the condition. It also increases circulation to the joints which brings nutrients to the joints and removes build up of toxins that further damage the joints.

My top supplements for the pain of osteoarthritis are serrapeptase (please see http://40plusandalliswell.blogspot.co.uk/2017/02/beating-inflammation-with-serrapeptase.html) which reduces inflammation and glucosamine with chondroitin. 

Glucosamine and chondroitin are naturally occurring in the cartilage at the end of bones. Taking it as a supplement may therefore help build up the cartilage cushion and also the synovial fluid between joints that acts as a lubricant. It is not a quick fix solution and is not effective for everyone but you should notice a difference if it is going to work for you within 6-8 weeks.  It also lowers the inflammation associated with the condition.  It also has no reported side effects for most people.  As a further benefit, glucosamine improves the microflora in the gut leading to better digestion which makes more nutrients available for joint health. 

Please also see 'Natural help for migraines'.

You might also like 'Yoga for seniors - healthy joints' on my yoga blog.

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Organic garden update - building bean frames and harvesting the winter onions

Thursday, 8 June 2017

Bean frame

The winter onions are out at last leaving room for squash to spread - phew.  If you remember a week or two ago we were panicking because we needed to transplant the squash and we thought the onions would be out in time to free up the space.  We had to plant the squash between the onions. For a recipe for onion soup with garlic croutons please see http://40plusandalliswell.blogspot.co.uk/2015/10/harvesting-onions.html


winter onions

Our self-pollinating runner beans were ready to transfer to the allotment last weekend so we set out to build a bean frame.  Purchasing bamboo sticks and twine from the local garden centre (we needed 18 x 6ft sticks and 4 x 3ft sticks because we were building two bean frames - we have a lot of bean plants!!!) we set to work inspired by a neighbouring allotment owner (it's how you learn!!). 


Becky constructing the bean frame

Using a trowel we dug 3 holes for the sticks in a line about 2 foot between each hole.  We pressed a stick into each hole and filled the holes in.  Just under 3 foot directly opposite each of the sticks we dug three more holes and repeated the process.  Using lengths of twine we tied the sticks that we opposite each other together. Another stick was secured between where the sticks crossed and two more lengthwise about 6 inches up from the base.  Secure the smaller sticks at either end of the bean frames. about 6 inches up.  Now to plant the bean plants INSIDE the bean frame.  Plant one by each upright stick and another between the sticks including the ends.  For extra purchase for your plants tie lengths of string between the top cross stick and the bottom sticks which were placed 6 inches from the ground. Surround the base of the bean frame with cling film. This is to give the bean plants some warmth and protection from wind and also from pests.  Now your bean frame is finished. See above for the finished article. We had winds of 41 miles an hour forecast yesterday. Let's hope that our frames were strong enough to withstand them!!

Happy gardening!

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Meatless Monday : Mushroom and white bean stew

Monday, 5 June 2017


In our little village near York it feels like summer has temporarily left us - it's pouring down and cool.  Not to worry, this comforting mushroom and white bean stew will cheer any wet weather day.  The mushrooms add a meaty texture and the beans provide protein to make this dish really satisfying.  Herbes de Provence is a mixture of dried herbs typically rosemary, savory, thyme, marjoram, and oregano - if you haven't any in your spice rack use a quarter teaspoon of  rosemary, thyme, marjoram and oregano. Serve with crusty bread to mop up the yummy sauce.  

Mushroom and white bean stew

Serves 2

You will need 
1 tbsp organic olive oil or rapeseed oil
1 red onion, peeled and chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
200g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
1/2 red pepper, sliced
6 cherry tomatoes, cut in 2
100g tomato puree
pinch stevia
1 tsp Herbes de Provence 
1 tsp pink salt dissolved in 250ml hot water
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
can organic cannellini beans

Crusty bread to serve

Heat the oil and cook the onion for 3 minutes.  Add the garlic, red pepper and mushrooms and cook for a further 2 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients except the beans and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes until the sauce is thickened.  Add the beans for the last 5 minutes.  Divide between bowls and serve with crusty bread.

Enjoy!


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This week on Flexiladiesyoga

Sunday, 4 June 2017


This week's qualities cultivated by yoga is resilience, the ability to meet life's challenges. 

Chakra translates as 'wheel' and is a spinning vortex of energy. There are seven of them in the body and they align with the spine. 
On my 'sister' blog we look at the individual chakras and how we can keep them in balance- http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/beginners-guide-to-chakras.html
This blog post was included in the online paper 'Yoga Vitality Magazine' -http://paper.li/Yoga_Vitality/1336524135#/

On my 'sister' blog we look at how you can protect your shoulders in Chaturanga Dandasana- http://flexiladies.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/avoiding-yoga-injuries-protecting-your.html

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The 40plusandalliswell guide to milk alternatives



At home we tend to use alternative milks for porridge and in recipes.  We don't use them for cups of tea because we drink herbal teas which do not need milk.  Below is our guide to the milks we have tried.

Almond milk is the alternative milk we are currently using.  Make sure you get unsweetened because the sweetened version of has sugar high up on the list of ingredients. Almond milk in common with most milk alternatives is fortified with vitamins A, D and riboflavin as well as calcium.  This is great news for vegans because there are limited sources vegetable sources of calcium and vitamin D and it may not be as easily absorbed as from vegetable sources. Almonds also are a source of vitamin E but may be lower in protein than some alternative milks.  We also like its sweet, creamy taste. It is available as roasted almond milk or unroasted.

Soy milk is also another favourite of ours and if you do have a sweet tooth you might be able to get soy milk sweetened with apple juice which is better than refined sugar.  Soy beans provide a complete protein and are a source of isoflavones.  They may help prevent certain cancers and may be useful for menopausal women. Someone once told me that having soya milk greatly improved her acne.  Be aware however that some people are allergic to soy.

Rice milk has a sweet pleasant flavour and it is a great substitute for milk if you have nut or soy allergies. It is good to use on cereals and in recipes. It is usually fortified with vitamins and calcium but it is low in protein. The other downside of rice milk is that rice is a source of arsenic so if you do use rice milk maybe alternate with another milk alternative such as oat milk (see below). Again, it is better to opt for the unsweetened version.

Coconut milk is rich and creamy because it is higher in fat that other alternative milks.  It has a lovely coconutty flavour which is great in curries, sauces and desserts but maybe not one for your morning cereal or cups of tea.

Oat milk has a pleasant, sweet flavour and is a source of soluble fibre and phytochemicals which help lower cholesterol and so help protect against cardiovascular disease.  It may not be gluten free however.

There are other milks too such as hemp milk which are a source of omega 3 but I haven't tried this one.

Enjoy

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Natural help for migraines

Thursday, 1 June 2017



I have had migraines since I was 12 years old.  I was reading a book which had received for Christmas a few days before.  By my side was a tin of chocolate which I was dipping into when I noticed a shadow on the page. This was followed by numbness in my right arm, zig zag vision and 30 minutes later a cracking headache. It was my first experience of migraine. Over the years I have discovered that I have various triggers which I try to avoid - chocolate, oranges, atmospheric changes (can't avoid this one), strobe lighting, going too long without food and glaring sunlight. Sometimes though they seem to happen for no reason.  I have also noticed that my migraines got much worse during hormonal upheavals such as puberty and menopause.  Over the years too I have tried various treatments which I now share with you.  

Acupuncture - this is the treatment I am currently receiving.  Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) believes that illness is a blockage to the flow of qi, the life energy, or that qi is congested.  Qi flows along channels called meridians along which the acupuncture points are located.  It is not a 'quick fix' solution.  I have been having a monthly treatment for several months and the interval between migraines is lengthening.  The hope is that eventually they will disappear altogether.  I also receive a massage and Chinese herbs to balance the kidney meridian as part of my treatment.  

Feverfew capsules - I found feverfew very effective for a few months but then my body seem to 'get used' to it and it did not seem as effective. I had taken it so long also that when I stopped I felt 'off colour' for about a week.  I would therefore not recommend it to be taken for more than four months. The other effect I noticed with feverfew is that it has a sedative effect.  This apparently is also an effect of conventional medicine which is great if your migraine is related to stress. Always check with your doctor before taking - feverfew is not for you if you take anti-coagulants for instance.  Also do not take it if you are allergic to the camomile family of plants.  

Co-enzyme Q10 has been found to be effective for migraines at doses of 150mg.  You may be short of co-enzyme Q10 if you are on statins.  

Magnesium relaxes your muscles so if your migraine is exacerbated by tension in for instance your neck, eat foods that supply magnesium such as grains, nuts, seeds and leafy green vegetables and maybe try a supplement.  

I also believe that the herb butterbur is effective for migraine but I haven't tried this one so I cannot vouch for it. Always check with your doctor before taking.

B vitamins may also help if your migraines are attributable to stress.  

Other advice - eat at regular intervals.  Low blood sugar can bring on a migraine. Have a regular bedtime and waketime, yes even at weekends - changes in sleep routine can bring on migraines.  Take steps to reduce stress such as yoga, breathing techniques and meditation. I had a terrible time with migraines just before and after my mother died.  You will find lots of help to reduce stress on my 'sister' blog, Flexiladiesyoga.  When in bright sunlight wear large sun glasses!  Strobe lighting is often used in shows and themed attractions.  You are usually warned of its use so my advice is cover your eyes as soon as it starts!! I also find dabbing some lavender essential oil on to my finger and then into my temples helps.

Hope this helps you, but work closely with your doctor when self-treating.

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